Recommended Posts

I assume there are other people here who love their animals. And I wanted to share pictures and stories about my family's dog. His life story is actually pretty special, and has taught me some very important lessons about animals.
 
In October 2012, my mom and I were taking our beloved Sadie to the dog park to play and she had a sudden heart attack and died. My entire family, especially my dad, was devastated. At the same time, it was almost better that way. Other health issues had made it clear that we were soon going to have to choose to send her on her way. My dad would have hated himself for putting her down, but hated himself more for keeping her alive in pain. We'd been following a boxer rescue society on Facebook for a while, considering getting Sadie a playmate and friend to make things easier for her and for us.
 
The rescue is always careful to select good adopters. They want to make sure that their boxers not only have a home, but they have a home where they will be cared for and loved, not abandoned or mistreated. We had submitted an application, but had specified that we weren't sure if we were ready yet. A few days after we lost our girl, my dad posted a memorial to Sadie on the rescue wall. Within an hour, he got an email saying that the pictures of our family with our boxer were inspiring. And that the head of the rescue would like to let us in on a secret.
 
A few weeks prior, there were a handful of boxers found in a high-kill shelter in Southern California. The shelter kept the dogs together in small cages with little room to move and run. Little care was given to them, as it was anticipated that they would be euthanized in a matter of days. The rescue sent two volunteers to the shelter to bring out as many boxers as they could take. One male and one female, slated for death, were crated together. Upon getting them to the vet here in Washington, it was discovered that neither had been "fixed." Yeah, brilliant shelter thinking "We have two unwanted, un-altered dogs of opposite sex. Let's crate them together. We're gonna kill them, it doesn't matter."

 

Several of the puppies in their weening box
Rescue+Puppies.jpg


The next week another pregnant dog came into the rescue and a neighbor of the host family said their dog was accidentally pregnant and they didn't want the pups. Any day, three litters were going to come to the rescue, and it was going to be very difficult to make sure they went to good homes with owners who were truly prepared to raise a new puppy. We were invited to be one of the pre-selected families who could get our pick of the puppies, if we would only drive up to visit them when they were a few weeks old and interact with each pup.
 
My siblings and I convinced our parents that we couldn't stay happy long without a dog, and Dad sent a description of our lifestyle and what we looked for in a dog back to the rescue. About a month later, my parents drove up to meet the "Fab Nineteen." Our first specification was color: we didn't want one that looked like Sadie. They brought out all the brindles to meet Mom and Dad. One little guy stood out perfectly. He chose my mom as his best friend. They'd set him to play with the other puppies, and he'd crawl back to her lap again and again. 
 

This is her yawning at him while he yawns.

Winston+Yawn.jpg


Just before Christmas, my dad, brother, and myself drove up and picked up our newest family member. My brother, on holding the as-yet-unnamed pup for the first time declared "I'll never be sad or lonely again!"

 

My brother with Winston

Winston+and+Mitch.jpg


We got him home, learned that he loves white paper and anything "up." Up included climbing on any boxes, chairs, laps, stairs, or pillows he could find and has since progressed to getting on the trampoline with my brother or on his own.

 

A collage of his first six months.

Winston+Six+Month+Collage.jpg

A "family photo" of the litter. Left to right: Lovie, Morgan, Winston, Baker (father), Ramona (mother).

IMG_7616.JPG


This is Winston. And I love him. And he's wonderful. And I'm just boasting now. :)

 

What I have learned and wanted to share was about rescues. I've discovered that there are many different societies and groups to help animals, but not all are equal. A kill shelter may save pets from a bad life, but is that really the best way? Dogs coming out of these places often have increased aggression and fear. Groups that seek to socialize and improve the temperament of the animals they rescue have much greater long term success. They find not only a good home for an animal, but a good pet for a family. 

 

Oh, and I want to see pictures of other people's pets too! :) Please share pictures and stories. 

Edited by Celairiel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They'd set him to play with the other puppies, and he'd crawl back to her lap again and again. 

I hadn't heard that part of the story before. :)

 

As someone who has interacted with Winston and witnessed his fear of oregano first-hand, I do have to say he's a pretty excitable guy that surrenders to his sister and has forgotten that he's not puppy-sized anymore.

 

 

I've never owned a pet myself (unless those tiny, cheap fish count, but I don't think they survived for very long). My brother owned gerbils when I was a kid (and cleaning their cage was how I saved up for A Link to the Past and Mega Man X). My grandfather was a huge dog lover while he was alive. I guess he practically always owned a dog. I remember and loved Merc, who was extremely well trained and who I spent two or three days teaching how to speak (she'd been trained so well that she was silent except when a car pulled up or someone unexpected showed up and hadn't greeted Grandpa yet).

 

I've also always been a cat person, as I think a few of you know. I used to have a good relationship with one of the neighborhood cats until his owner locked him inside. Poor guy's been trapped in that house for years, and he was accustomed to being an outdoors cat before that.

 

There's also a strange surplus of rabbits in my neighborhood. They just sort of showed up several years back. Occasionally there'll be one or two in my driveway or yard when I get home late at night. I was able to pet one once, and that was cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like dogs and cats, but they certainly need lots of attention and love, and I can't love anything with work and school going on right now. Maybe after I graduate next year. Oh, I came across like 30 rabbits after class a few nights ago. They were quite adorable as they hopped away from me...

My family has a talking parrot. It has recently started to give people air kisses and it's learning to say "I love you".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does a parrot give air kisses? I imagine that sound would be amazingly tricky to make with a beak. Or does it not make a typical kissy noise? Either way, that is adorable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i got some pets... birds and fish. my fishies are always hungry. I haven't been paying too much attention to them and sometimes I miss a cleaning session. I have to try to get better at that... these poor little goldfishes. 

Edited by Bed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is Winston. And I love him. And he's wonderful. And I'm just boasting now. :)

 

What I have learned and wanted to share was about rescues. I've discovered that there are many different societies and groups to help animals, but not all are equal. A kill shelter may save pets from a bad life, but is that really the best way? Dogs coming out of these places often have increased aggression and fear. Groups that seek to socialize and improve the temperament of the animals they rescue have much greater long term success. They find not only a good home for an animal, but a good pet for a family. 

 

Aww, Winston's story is heart-warming.  Rescues are wonderful, and I wish more people would choose adoption rather than opt for the expensive purebred.  Regarding kill shelters, I think a lot of it comes down to our inability to feed, house, care for, and adopt out all the animals without loving homes.  It's unfortunate that kill shelters exist, but the reality is there are just too many animals (another reason to adopt and not buy from a breeder!).  I'm not trying to defend kill shelters--just trying to point out the other side of the fence--but it gets frustrating how complicated and political things can get involving animals.

 

HummingGillz, any videos of the air kissing?  Sounds cute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pets posting in Pets. I was highly amused by the notification this gave me.

 

And I do agree that there is a need for kill shelters, sadly. I am just as distressed by mistreated or under-cared-for animals as I am by killing them. What bothers me is how the methods used at kill shelters often make animals more aggressive and therefore more difficult to adopt out. My grandparents' dog came from a shelter that (knowing more now) was probably a kill shelter. He was never properly socialized, and his treatment at the shelter only exacerbated the problems. He is now what I would consider a dangerous dog. When in control, he's wonderful. But you cannot predict when he'll lash out. 

 

Both Winston and my grandparents' dog are pure boxers. A lot of the "showy" breeds can actually be found pure through rescue societies dedicated to that breed. I'm guessing this is due in large part to the backyard breeder industry. Anyone who owns a purebred anything feels like they can make some easy cash by breeding and selling pups. Then, when a puppy grows up and is no longer as cute, or poops inside one too many times, or whatever, they get abandoned. People who say they want a purebred have no excuse not to adopt, in my mind. Find a rescue dedicated to your breed of choice. It may take longer to get a dog as you wait for a good match, but it's so worth it. 

 

In fact, it's a good way to not have to be in charge of potty training your dog, since you can adopt one at any age. And you'll often get to know more about the personality before taking it home. Our rescue fosters the dogs, and all adopters get to talk to the foster family and learn about the personality, training, and temperament of their dog. It's a really good system that can increase the chances of a good fit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a *soon-to-be* 7 year old black cat named Gypsy that has lived with us since she was 4 months old :) We adopted her and have loved her ever since. My daughter adores her, but can't be trusted to play with her yet as we don't believe in declawing Gypsy. She's been a wonderful cat, but has an immune disorder called "rodent ulcer". We're trying to keep it under control with medications and baths, which of course she doesn't enjoy, but at least tolerates.

 

Picture below :)

 

100_0107.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two black cats: Sheldon (right) and Tennant (left).

 

10296872_1408591756085848_1539626698_n.j

 

Sheldon (named after a Big Bang Theory character), I got 3 years ago when I first started my job. He was a stray a coworker found and I believe she said looked 2-3 years old she found him. He's super chill and basically I can do anything to him and he doesn't care. Occasionally, I take him on walks on a leash. He does fairly well for the most part.

 

8cf58bee8b6b11e293a222000a1fb70a_7.jpg

 

Tennant (named after my favorite Doctor Who actor), is a rascal. I got him last summer when I was painting my living room and decided to go to Walmart while waiting for paint to dry. Someone was handing out free kittens and my friends coerced me to take one. I thought he was unique because he had a stripe pattern underneath his black fur. I think he's part savannah cat because he's at least 22 lbs. He hates everything...being picked up, getting his claws trimmed, taking a bath...biggest whiner ever. However, he's much more cuddly than Sheldon and would rub up against my hand and face a lot when he wants attention.

 

10358309_696242693745022_558244816_n.jpg

 

This Halloween, Sheldon is going to be Toothless (from How to Train Your Dragon), because he has the same color eyes as Toothless. Tennant might be Luna from Sailor Moon if I can figure how to stick a crescent shaped something on his forehead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two black cats: Sheldon (right) and Tennant (left).

 

10296872_1408591756085848_1539626698_n.j

 

Sheldon (named after a Big Bang Theory character), I got 3 years ago when I first started my job. He was a stray a coworker found and I believe she said looked 2-3 years old she found him. He's super chill and basically I can do anything to him and he doesn't care. Occasionally, I take him on walks on a leash. He does fairly well for the most part.

 

8cf58bee8b6b11e293a222000a1fb70a_7.jpg

 

Tennant (named after my favorite Doctor Who actor), is a rascal. I got him last summer when I was painting my living room and decided to go to Walmart while waiting for paint to dry. Someone was handing out free kittens and my friends coerced me to take one. I thought he was unique because he had a stripe pattern underneath his black fur. I think he's part savannah cat because he's at least 22 lbs. He hates everything...being picked up, getting his claws trimmed, taking a bath...biggest whiner ever. However, he's much more cuddly than Sheldon and would rub up against my hand and face a lot when he wants attention.

 

10358309_696242693745022_558244816_n.jpg

 

This Halloween, Sheldon is going to be Toothless (from How to Train Your Dragon), because he has the same color eyes as Toothless. Tennant might be Luna from Sailor Moon if I can figure how to stick a crescent shaped something on his forehead.

 

OMG THEY'RE BOTH ADORABLE. I love black cats <3

 

Toothless is totally the best costume idea ever. I'm so glad How to Train Your Dragon 2 didn't suffer from Cash Grab Sequel Syndrome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now