Shattered Rift

Fashion

54 posts in this topic

I always heard them referred to as khakis, and we are both from the PNW. But khaki is technically a color, the "traditional" color for chinos.

I am 6'3" and really wear 29-30x34-36, I think. Of course nothing goes that tall in 29 waist. But 30x34 fits very nice on chinos... um... Urban Slim Fit from J. Crew. I have 30x36 of Levi's 501s and those are perfect at the moment. Slim for me in the thigh, but not too slim. I have 31x36 Levi's 505 which are on the border of being too big in the waist without a belt. Just relaxed enough to be very comfy. 505 does not go 30x36.

Get those chinos/khakis. I wore nothing but jeans when not formal forever, but I wear my grey and navy chinos more often now.

I also recommend that anyone try out some chukka boots. I am addicted to boots now. Two different pairs of Clarks Bushacre II to give them alternating days off. My favorite shoes for day to day wear. I do live in the desert, and they are desert boots. Okay in AZ year around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I was understanding (and it may be wrong, as it was just one explanation), there's a crossover from khakis to chinos that's describing a range of clothing ranging kind of between jeans (in being tougher "work pants," which was kind of how they were describing khakis) to being dressier and falling short of dress slacks (in being lighter, more formal wear, which was kind of how they were describing chinos). As I said, I could use something that's less dressy than my dress slacks but still a noticeable step up from jeans.

 

How do the J. Crew and 501s stack up in that regard? (I'll definitely keep both in mind to take a look at regardless, but I thought I'd clarify on what exactly is appealing to me right now.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops, late,night typing. Both of those Levis are jeans. Was explaining for Bed.

You will have to look at the J. Crew to evaluate how dressy. I wear them casually, but they are kind of on that boundary...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My dress pants do not. I have two functioning front pockets, although they're extremely shallow, and... there's a back pocket... but it's fake. Like. I was actually excited when I bought them. "OH MAN, YEAH, I HAVE A BACK POCKET!" and then I tried to stick my wallet there and... "what... what is this... IT'S. CLEVER STITCHING. It only looks like a pocket when it's actually NOTHING. HA.HA. EXCELLENT JOKE, CLOTHING INDUSTRY."

Meanwhile I can find 6? functional pockets on my shorts that I got from the guy's section. :/

 

 

Uhm, I feel as if you know probably this, but I did want to point it out:

 

When buying dress clothes, a lot of the time the pockets on the pants are actually simply sewn shut. Like, take a seam ripper and open the pocket up to make it useable after you buy them kind of shut. I've had to deal with this a lot of the time specifically with dress pants, and haven't even actually seen dress pants with fake back pockets, so if that's really what it is that's quite impressive xD

 

 

Not gonna lie, but there are (rare) moments when I wish I carried a purse to have extra crap with me. I can't remember anything useful off-hand, but Cel could probably mention a thing or two I've been glad she was carrying in her purse.

 

Get a murse. No one will notice.

 

In regards to the wallet/pocket conversation: I think Rift or someone pointed out the truth: the front pockets on women's pants are rarely functional, so I have to put my wallet and such in my back pockets. Granted, some of the time these back pockets have snaps or something on them to keep them closed...so there's that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I greatly appreciate them and have found that the pockets on either of those things are loads more useful than the pockets on any pair of women's jeans that I have ever owned ever.

 

Pockets on dresses amuses me and I'm always delighted by how well-hidden they are. Usually I don't know about them until I discover them by accident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love pockets on dresses/skirts! I've even gone as far as altering skirts to have pockets in them (then altering the waist band in such a way so the skirt hangs naturally with stuff in them). Speaking of, do any of y'all make your own clothes? If so, what do you make? From scratch or patterns?

 

I cosplay, so most of that is from scratch and in my head. I haven't bought and followed a pattern for any of my clothing yet (given, I mostly make circle skirts and know basics of sewing).

 

As far as clothing goes, I've been mostly a graphics (nerdy) tee + jeans + flats person all of my life. Then I got into the working world and my company was "business casual", so I started dressing nicer (printed pencil skirts, brightly-colored or patterned blouses, fun wedges/heels, etc.) Then recently the company changed to "creative casual", which I have reverted back to my comfy gear. I do try to dress nicer for church, but most of the time I'm casual. If I'm on a date, then I'll dress up more, depending on the setting.

 

Recently, I've been trying to purge my wardrobe of tshirts (as I do have over 100 the last time I counted) and get more nice, casual clothes. StitchFix has helped a lot with that (I opt for a box every other month and I buy an item every other box...usually a top, but the jeans they sent me are SO COMFY, but so out of my price range). That helps and just through osmosis of my co-workers, I've been taking a liking to J.Crew, Banana Republic, Anthropologie, and Kate Spade. Finally fulfilling my parent's wishes for me to dress more "ladylike", hah.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might have to take a look at StitchFix, Zilary. I have no idea what my dress size is though... It's different at every store I go to, plus I'm trying to lose some weight... Maybe I'll keep it on the back burner for a few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Half of the clothes in my closet consist of office skirts, nice blouses, and general office clothes. I need to be a cute office girl for work. 

 

The other forty percent are what I think of as date clothes. Cute one piece dresses, skirts, mini skirts, shorts, short shorts, etc. An additional five percent are casual clothes, like jeans and t-shirts. And the last five percent is a secret. <3

 

For shoes, I typically wear flats or heels. It's been a very long time since I've worn sandals or sneakers, now that I think about it.

 

I'm a size five in women's for shoes and a size 0/size 00/Small/X-small for clothes. As such, Forever 21 is my favorite brand, since they're probably one of the very few companies out there that carry clothes my size without it being in the children's section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm a size five in women's for shoes and a size 0/size 00/Small/X-small for clothes. As such, Forever 21 is my favorite brand, since they're probably one of the very few companies out there that carry clothes my size without it being in the children's section.

 

I can relate with the shopping in the children's section (or being very tempted to). J.Crew and Banana Republic have pretty good selection for petites. I'm a size 6-6.5 in shoes and have a hard time doing shoe swaps with my girl friends, but can understand. Also, finding a pair of jeans I don't need to hem or roll up is near impossible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allen Edmonds are on sale right now:

 

http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/cati2_Clearance_1_40000000001_-1_____127607__130263___

 

http://shop.nordstrom.com/c/anniversary-sale-mens-shoes?origin=leftnav#category=b60168475&type=category&page=1&defaultsize3=&size=&width=&color=&price=&brand=28&instoreavailability=false&lastfilter=brand&sizeFinderId=9&resultsmode=&segmentId=0

 

Anyway, what brought me back to this thread is dress shirts. As I was saying before, dress shirts are a nightmare for me, to the point that I have never even felt like a dress shirt even comes close to fitting. I just ordered a made-to-measure from Modern Tailor. Will try to update when it comes in a few weeks from now. I hope I got the measurements right! First shirt deal has a few fabric options for 30 dollars with shipping.

 

http://www.moderntailor.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're basically my same height/build but a little thinner, right? You're not taller than me, are you? Honestly, most small-sized shirts would fit you well. I don't know if you would like the way they'd make you look (I personally do), in which case most medium-sizes. Unless I'm completely misunderstanding what you mean when you talk about Americans having huge clothing.

Hmm... I'm pretty sure you weigh like 20 pounds more than me. I'm at 130 pounds... but according to these charts and whatnot, my ideal weight is about 160 pounds. So yeah, thinner. I don't think I'm taller. I remember you said you were around 6 feet? The last time I checked my height was in high school and I was 5'11. I do have small shirts but the problem is that it rides up my armpits and when i cross my arms, it's just so tight up there. The small shirts seem to work on shorter people though... I usually get medium shirts because o of my shoulders. My stature is for medium - large... it's just I'm skinny :/.

 

Jeans can start to become comfortable in the $50-$100 price range. I tried on a pair at Macy's one time and was pleasantly surprised. I haven't really worn sweatpants in several years (other than a contemporary dance class three(?) years back). I'm pretty sure I wore khakis when I was youngish (10-14?), but I switched to jeans at some point and never went back. Something about khakis always felt wrong to me, but I should go back and give them a fresh try. And if you have pants that don't work without a belt, the waist size on them is too big. (I'm a 30-32. You might be a 28-32, which will suck to find.) This is possibly just my opinion, but pants should fit and stay up without a belt. The belt is kind of like a guarantee and it adds a bit of style (particularly if you like enjoyable belt buckles).

The last time I bought pants was probably 5 years ago and I think I got 30 x 32. I've tried 28 and 29 but felt the pinch in the crotch area and waist. And when you sit, ouch. I think Jeans are great for heavy duty stuff though, they're durable and adds some protection. Khakis are just lighter and easy to move around... like jump around and stuff. I do that sometimes. But sweat pants are the way to go for me, or some other form of it.

 

 

I always heard them referred to as khakis, and we are both from the PNW. But khaki is technically a color, the "traditional" color for chinos.

That makes sense. It's the first time I heard about chinos as well. I thought it was a spanish group or something hehe.

Edited by Bed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You're basically my same height/build but a little thinner, right? You're not taller than me, are you? Honestly, most small-sized shirts would fit you well. I don't know if you would like the way they'd make you look (I personally do), in which case most medium-sizes. Unless I'm completely misunderstanding what you mean when you talk about Americans having huge clothing.

Hmm... I'm pretty sure you weigh like 20 pounds more than me. I'm at 130 pounds... but according to these charts and whatnot, my ideal weight is about 160 pounds. So yeah, thinner. I don't think I'm taller. I remember you said you were around 6 feet? The last time I checked my height was in high school and I was 5'11. I do have small shirts but the problem is that it rides up my armpits and when i cross my arms, it's just so tight up there. The small shirts seem to work on shorter people though... I usually get medium shirts because o of my shoulders. My stature is for medium - large... it's just I'm skinny :/.

I'm 6'2" and range from 135 to 140. So yeah. I think small Medium-sized shirts would be the best bet for you, then. Large shirts shouldn't be necessary at all. The way to know proper fit in the shoulders is for the shoulder seams to hit about the edge/corner of your shoulder. Or a little bit short of that. If the seam falls off your shoulder, it's generally a sign that the shirt is too big. Fit matters too, of course. But for picking up generic clothes off the rack, what I've suggested should do the trick. And slim-fitting stuff. But sometimes things get marked as slim for the sake of advertising rather than actually meaning slim. And some brands also do more slim-fitting shirts but don't specify.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, Rift.  Put on some weight.  Make me feel bad, why don't you?

 

Supposedly my ideal weight is around 150.  When I was that weight...I looked really fricken scrawny.  I prefer 170-180...which means I only have another 60 pounds to lose.  

 

Even then, though, my shoulders have always been broad, and I've got a fairly large neck.  In standard off  the shelf clothing, when I was skinny, the clothes I needed to buy to fit my neck and shoulders kind of just hung on me.  I was lucky enough to find a couple of dress shirts that fit right--but I think I managed to find 3 or 4 of the right size in an entire department store.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Those of you that follow me on Facebook know that I've got an extensive tie collection, but one of the things I've been struggling with has been matching ties with colored shirts. I'm not sure if it's the lack of a tertiary color being included in my outfit, but even sticking to colors in the same general range as the shirt (reds with purples, greens with blues, etc) rarely seem to pop. The only combination that seems to work well is a dark purple shirt of mine with a tie that is primarily purple with lowlights of navy blue.

So far as I'm aware, this isn't a subject that comes up with the various resources online, as most of the fashion websites are aimed at the lowest common denominator.

 

I'm also curious, as many of us seem to be in a similar life stage, how many of you have needed to improve your style game to keep up with work and social needs? I know I'm in a minority, being able (and encouraged) to wear flamboyant outfits for work. But I'd like to know, in you guys' place of work, has there been more formal expectations or is the trend shifting towards casual work environments? I know that this is at least partly regional, as I saw very casually dressed dance instructors while I was down in Salt Lake City, as opposed to here in Portland where there's a mix (and very few are that casually dressed).

Edited by Shattered Rift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out alpham on youtube. Channel devoted to men's fashion, hygiene and health. Great advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say, keep your ties as an accent and your general wardrobe full of neutral basics (whites/cream/ivory, light greys, dark greys, etc.). If you are keen to match your tie with your shirt, I would say go complimentary instead of direct tone-on-tone, which is the issue of your ties getting lost if they are too similar to your shirt color. Complimentary schemes might be a blue tie (cool) with a cream shirt (warm) or an orange tie (warm) with a light blue (cool) shirt. If your tie is patterned/illustrated, I would keep the shirt as one-color/blank as possible. And vice-versa, if your tie is a single color, you can play up your shirt with a subtle plaid or polka dots.

As far my company goes, when I started, we were "business casual" (J.Crew and Kate Spade) with "casual" (tshirt jeans) on Fridays. Then somewhere in the middle, we got a bit more restricted and went to more "business professional" (pencil skirts and blouses). Now we are "creative casual" and you can do whatever, so most of the times I wear jeans and graphic tshirt. Recently, I have been trying to live more minimally (I know there's another thread with this discussion somewhere) and that includes purging my wardrobe. So my current tactic is to get a lot of neutrals as my base and spice it up with a fun accent necklace or cute pattern on shoes (Old Navy is my go-to). I personally prefer working in the most comfortable clothes possible, but now that I am rising up the corporate ladder, I am in more meetings with important clients, so I try not to look so "hobo-esque" at work.

Blacjak likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

32 minutes ago, Blacjak said:

Check out alpham on youtube. Channel devoted to men's fashion, hygiene and health. Great advice.

I've been following Real Men Real Style for years. I've got a friend who really enjoys Art of Manliness, though their articles have never resonated with me. I'll take a glance at AlphaM.

23 minutes ago, Zilary said:

I would say, keep your ties as an accent and your general wardrobe full of neutral basics (whites/cream/ivory, light greys, dark greys, etc.). If you are keen to match your tie with your shirt, I would say go complimentary instead of direct tone-on-tone, which is the issue of your ties getting lost if they are too similar to your shirt color. Complimentary schemes might be a blue tie (cool) with a cream shirt (warm) or an orange tie (warm) with a light blue (cool) shirt. If your tie is patterned/illustrated, I would keep the shirt as one-color/blank as possible. And vice-versa, if your tie is a single color, you can play up your shirt with a subtle plaid or polka dots.

This has generally been my approach in the past, and it would work extremely well if I was in a more typical business environment, but I'm trying to push the extremes. I typically do wear a white shirt for the reasons mentioned (and occasionally black) and have only recently added a dark grey to my wardrobe. But it's working with colors that I really want to push. I'll need to experiment with the warm and cool matchups.

I also stick with plain shirts. There are very few patterned shirts that appeal to me, and ties are always the conversation piece anyway. (Though fancier shirts is something to keep in mind for one of these days.)

23 minutes ago, Zilary said:

As far my company goes, when I started, we were "business casual" (J.Crew and Kate Spade) with "casual" (tshirt jeans) on Fridays. Then somewhere in the middle, we got a bit more restricted and went to more "business professional" (pencil skirts and blouses). Now we are "creative casual" and you can do whatever, so most of the times I wear jeans and graphic tshirt.

How many years did those transitions happen over?

Edit: There's the old Fashion thread. Merged it with this one.

Edited by Shattered Rift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what is expected depends on the company and age/type of occupation. I know some people working for google who can basically wear sweatpants everyday. I work as a consultant in an engineering firm, so no ties needed, but dress shirt/pants/shoes are required. It us more strict for guys here, because style is limited to a certain look that makes you look knowledgeable. For some reason, girls can wear whatever fancy look they like. Maybe a stylish cute coat. Or a nice dress sweater, whatever that is called.

I've been wearing loafers, and I'm told that's not good enough because they look like boat shoes. Clearly they are not, but it looks like leather and a dress shoe in my opinion. For girls, loafer like shoes is no problem for them. It seems the only kind of shoes acceptable for men are those uncomfortable pointy toe shoes.

the first few weeks, I was riding a plain red dress shirt and some faded work pants with some of the most comfortable boat shoes.

then my boss took me to the side and said some bad things about the way I dressed.

now I wear the same thing each day. I upgraded to business like brown loafers - that's as far as I would like to go. I don't know why I don't like pointy shoes that much. I combo those loafers with some black pants. I also upgraded the pants to a smooth fabric I can't recall right now. But it was more comfortable than my regular cotton work pants so it was nice. Then a light patterned dress shirt. The patterns give you more of a sophistication, while plain color ones are more for marketing or something. Admins, receptionists, marketing, everyone in the front look a bit more clean.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Red said:

Marry a girl who knows men's fashion. Go with her every time you go to buy clothing. 

 

Done.

I find that the list of things needed in a wife continues to lengthen to the point where it becomes unreasonable. It's caused my list to compress to a few specifics that have much broader implications (such as dancer, which inherently includes height and body type as well as athleticism).

7 hours ago, Bed said:

I've been wearing loafers, and I'm told that's not good enough because they look like boat shoes. Clearly they are not, but it looks like leather and a dress shoe in my opinion. For girls, loafer like shoes is no problem for them. It seems the only kind of shoes acceptable for men are those uncomfortable pointy toe shoes.

Were you wearing the super casual style of loafers that have the... not strings, exactly, but sort of like strings going along the sides? Loafers are definitely casual, and I repeatedly waffle on whether or not I actually like loafers, but most loafers should be able to get by just fine. Coloring matters too: black always looks more formal.

Pointy toes? As in the box toe? They're hideous and make for an abrupt end-point. Always go rounded toe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Shattered Rift said:

 

17 hours ago, Zilary said:

As far my company goes, when I started, we were "business casual" (J.Crew and Kate Spade) with "casual" (tshirt jeans) on Fridays. Then somewhere in the middle, we got a bit more restricted and went to more "business professional" (pencil skirts and blouses). Now we are "creative casual" and you can do whatever, so most of the times I wear jeans and graphic tshirt.

How many years did those transitions happen over?

When I arrived, it was about 6 years ago for the "business casual". Then 2 years in, it got "business professional". Then a year after that, it has been "creative casual" since.

Oh, I also remember hearing about "the third piece" that I'm trying to also incorporate into my work wardrobe more. Shirt + pants = 2 pieces...then add a cardigan, scarf, chunky necklace as the third piece. As for guys, I know bowties/ties are pretty default, but blazers and sweater vests might be a nice addition. If you're up for it, a nice pocket square can also be a good touch. I know a guy at work who always wore his neon running shoes with his nice shirt and pants and another guy who mixes up his funky patterned socks, so he wore pants that were purposely a little above the ankle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

8 hours ago, Shattered Rift said:

Were you wearing the super casual style of loafers that have the... not strings, exactly, but sort of like strings going along the sides? Loafers are definitely casual, and I repeatedly waffle on whether or not I actually like loafers, but most loafers should be able to get by just fine. Coloring matters too: black always looks more formal.

Pointy toes? As in the box toe? They're hideous and make for an abrupt end-point. Always go rounded toe.

This is the shoe I am wearing. Had them for almost 3 years so far and still good. The colors are a bit more faded than before, but I like the faded look as well:

41K12uuXs3L._LX90_.jpg

Made of washable suede, I think lightweight, flat, laceless, with good ventilation is the best. I've had bad experience with other shoes, ones that cover your ankles give you bad ventilation, and you end up sweating or stinking. This type of shoe is not great if you happen to need to run. It can slip out if you're going too fast.

What is expected are oxfords:

41+2bxjqk0L._AC_UL260_SR200,260_.jpg

These range from point to round to square. I'm not particularly against pointy tip shoes, it was just something I thought of when I was trying to describe oxfords at the time. The front area of the shoe goes to a tip, making it triangle shape, so it goes to the point. Even if it is round tip, I think the cone shape of these kind of shoes are uncomfortable. Compared to the loafer I have up there, it is more pill shape, comfortable overall. Also, the sole of the shoes are very hard, and I am not fond of the block of plastic for the heel. Not very flexible. I prefer shoes with sole that are flexible enough to curl up.

For dress socks, I think men are able to be more creative here. I've seen a lot of professionals, the ones with executive vests and ties and stuff wear wild designs for socks. They are only noticeable while sitting though - when the pants lift up a bit. I would not go extreme colors, I have yet to see that. The sock just has more room for designs, and they should be a bit elegant designs. Usually they are angular designs.

I got striped socks, and I like them, but I don't think its great as for as "elegance." They look a bit kiddy, but I don't really care. The bad part is that your socks are more important if you have low cut shoes, like the loafers above - so you probably want dark colored socks to not draw too much attention to your feet.

not what I have, but been eyeing these:

51G3GnxdzRL._AC_UL260_SR200,260_.jpg

I buy all my clothes online so I happen to have pictures:

41cIIWlqL+L._LY90_.jpg

Perry Ellis Men's Portfolio Modern Fit Flat Front Bengaline Pant - 77% polyester 23% rayon.

This is mostly for comfort, but the fashion is more toward slimmed down version of these pants. I don't wear slim clothes and pants because I'm already skinny as-is, so I don't like to show my body lines. If I get more shaped up, I'd go for a more slimmer version. For now, modern fit seems to be it.

This is the belt I got:

51kMus3nnHL._LY90_.jpg

This isn't fashionable, typically you go for some brown leather. I didn't intend for the braided look, I was just looking for something that is not hard leather but flexible/stretchable. If the braid was smaller that it wasn't noticeable, that would be great. I'm looking for a belt like this, but instead of the metal buckle, I'm looking for a Velcro version. I don't think these exists.

For dress shirts, I tend to go lightweight fabric, soft collar (kinda hard to find these), subtle square patterns.

Should I try to compromise to look more fashionable? My boss seems to think so. It's been 3 years and suddenly I get comments that it's not good enough.

I would step up my game, but I have some sort of mental blockage for showing off my ###### curves and stuff.

 

Edited by Bed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, Zilary said:

Oh, I also remember hearing about "the third piece" that I'm trying to also incorporate into my work wardrobe more. Shirt + pants = 2 pieces...then add a cardigan, scarf, chunky necklace as the third piece. As for guys, I know bowties/ties are pretty default, but blazers and sweater vests might be a nice addition. If you're up for it, a nice pocket square can also be a good touch. I know a guy at work who always wore his neon running shoes with his nice shirt and pants and another guy who mixes up his funky patterned socks, so he wore pants that were purposely a little above the ankle.

For men, the typical upgrade is a watch, though watches are in a kind of flux in different circles because of their "uselessness." Bracelets and rings are also an option. Pocket squares only really work with blazers/suits. I've been wanting to add a bracelet to my wardrobe. (Hm, I can't seem to remember the name of the brand. I lost a handful of my links when I reformatted.) Edit: Found them. I've been debating this guy and that guy. Not sure which I prefer more. And I tend to prefer silver to gold in my jewelry.

8 hours ago, Bed said:

Made of washable suede, I think lightweight, flat, laceless, with good ventilation is the best. I've had bad experience with other shoes, ones that cover your ankles give you bad ventilation, and you end up sweating or stinking. This type of shoe is not great if you happen to need to run. It can slip out if you're going too fast.

Most dress shoes stop below the ankle bone. Only boots (chukkas or chelseas) cover the ankle. Also, if your foot is slipping out of a loafer while running, I'd wager the loafer might be a half-size too big.

8 hours ago, Bed said:

Compared to the loafer I have up there, it is more pill shape, comfortable overall. Also, the sole of the shoes are very hard, and I am not fond of the block of plastic for the heel. Not very flexible. I prefer shoes with sole that are flexible enough to curl up.

For dress socks, I think men are able to be more creative here. I've seen a lot of professionals, the ones with executive vests and ties and stuff wear wild designs for socks. They are only noticeable while sitting though - when the pants lift up a bit. I would not go extreme colors, I have yet to see that. The sock just has more room for designs, and they should be a bit elegant designs. Usually they are angular designs.

That's a blucher, not an oxford. The difference with bluches is that they have the open laces like that, whereas an oxford or balmoral has closed lacing where the underside/between spaces of the laces are hidden. Not all dress shoes are uncomfortable. Soles are made out of different materials. It's partially a reflection of cost.

Thanks for bringing up socks. They're definitely a fun thing to play around with in the right environment, but they're pretty low down on my list of clothes to play with.

8 hours ago, Bed said:

I'm looking for a belt like this, but instead of the metal buckle, I'm looking for a Velcro version. I don't think these exists.

For dress shirts, I tend to go lightweight fabric, soft collar (kinda hard to find these), subtle square patterns.

Should I try to compromise to look more fashionable? My boss seems to think so. It's been 3 years and suddenly I get comments that it's not good enough.

I would step up my game, but I have some sort of mental blockage for showing off my ###### curves and stuff.

I can't ever think of hearing about a velcro belt. There are those seat belt belts.

Soft collars do seem to be getting rarer in dress shirts. I have a few ancient ones.

I'd recommend finding one or two particular areas to step up. I assume your shirt is fine, your pants are fine, and your shoes are fine. Are you still running as slim as I remember you being, or have you put on weight? Personally, I really like vests. Zilary's suggestion of sweater vests is good if you want to look more casual, but you're trying to avoid that. Your belt is the other obvious thing. Keep in mind that browns and tans are less formal than blacks. A black braided belt would look significantly better, though you might want to avoid the braided look at all.

Edited by Shattered Rift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

On ‎5‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 6:49 PM, Shattered Rift said:

Found them. I've been debating this guy and that guy. Not sure which I prefer more. And I tend to prefer silver to gold in my jewelry.

That guy looks nice, but this guy... I mean. I have this fear of things poking into me, including piercing, metals, hard stuff on my body. That's why I was looking for a Velcro belt. You know when you undress and find a crater or lines on your body? That was always weird to see. Plus, piercings look like they hurt too. And there's always gold poisoning, and something seems unclean when you see smears of skin or face oil on someone's metal accessories.

I think there's something wrong with me...

On ‎5‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 6:49 PM, Shattered Rift said:

Most dress shoes stop below the ankle bone. Only boots (chukkas or chelseas) cover the ankle. Also, if your foot is slipping out of a loafer while running, I'd wager the loafer might be a half-size too big.

You're right, my shoes are always bigger rather than tighter. I think I'm in-between sizes.

On ‎5‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 6:49 PM, Shattered Rift said:

I'd recommend finding one or two particular areas to step up. I assume your shirt is fine, your pants are fine, and your shoes are fine. Are you still running as slim as I remember you being, or have you put on weight? Personally, I really like vests. Zilary's suggestion of sweater vests is good if you want to look more casual, but you're trying to avoid that. Your belt is the other obvious thing. Keep in mind that browns and tans are less formal than blacks. A black braided belt would look significantly better, though you might want to avoid the braided look at all.

Thanks for the recommendation. Got a black version of the belt for work. I usually wear the light tan one outside of work. I am running pretty slim. I don't think an additional 5 pounds changes much.

I always thought vests were weird to be honest. I haven't grown up much... but I've always seen vests to be an adult classy stylish thing, and less of functionality. I also stereotyped people wearing them too, thinking people that wear them are rich. I don't think I can imagine myself wearing one...

I usually just wear regular sweaters, but I get it - makes me appear preppy when worn with a dress shirt. I was told specifically, that this isn't college, it's a professional work place while wearing such sweaters. But...

So nowadays, I wear a sweater on the inside, and dress shirt on the outside, for warmth purposes. I found out more about 'thermal' wear after that.  :P

 

Edited by Bed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now