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I suspect that's entry level. You'll probably want to add a food processor to that soon, because one of the fastest ways to get salt out of your diet is not using canned food and it's a pain to do that by hand.

I experiment a bit with making my own recipes, so I'd be happy to try to help as well.

I grew up under the delusion of a milk allergy, so I understand the frustration of having to work around something that gets shoved in every product, sometimes for no apparent reason. I'm also working on gluten free recipes for someone in my family, and corn/potato free recipes for a coworker. :( 

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Entry level, yeah. I'd agree.

I'd say try stir-fry. It's easy to add your own spices based on what you like. I make fajitas pretty simply by slicing chicken, onion, and peppers up and stir-frying them. I start with the onion slices in some oil on the pan, after I've pushed them around a little, I add the bell pepper. When they are done, I take them out and cook the chicken in the same pan. I would suggest lime juice, pepper, cumin, garlic powder, and chili powder as your spices. Stir-fry the chicken strips then eat it in a tortilla. Easy, no added salt.

I'll poke through my official recipes and try to post some links up here.

Like Inu said, home cooking is going to help a lot. It's amazing how much you can freeze. Get a blender or food processor so you can make soups. Good luck!

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I'm sorry to hear that your week has been so rough, Kirby. I can't imagine needing to adjust my diet that drastically, but I can relate to not being able to dance (and it's the worst thing in the world).

Rhythm Two Step? What's the basic step that you're doing for it? There are a lot of different names that get used regionally for the various dances, and I'm assuming it's a country dance (and the names on those tend to vary even more).

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You also save money cooking and freezing. (More info than you wanted to know about cost savings:)

Spoiler

Average American budgets spend from $6.05-$8.23 per meal, depending on the age demographic. Personally, I average about $2.83 because I eat out but also cook at home, and I'm not making an effort to be frugal. If you are, for $1, you can get a burger at McDonalds, or a frozen "healthy, but not really" meal at the grocery store, or "ramen" packets can get you down to $0.25 (or $0.17 if you buy in bulk and don't add anything but water). Cooking at home in a batch and freezing it each week, my mother can get things like a bowl of soup or a bowl of chili down to the $0.20 range with crackers and vegetables. My grandmother, by cooking and freezing for the month in larger batches, gets it down to the $0.05 range, and lower with ham & beans.

 

I've gone through the dietary requirements for Meniere's, and worked something out. This one (fish pasta) isn't designed to save money, but it's not particularly expensive either:

Spoiler

Sauce:

  • 1 tsp oregano (0.45mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp basil (0.07mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp white pepper (0.04mg sodium, or subtsitute with 1/4 tsp black pepper at 0.12mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder (2mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp onion powder (1.75mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp ground mustard powder (0.33mg sodium)
  • 1/4 tsp thyme (0.02mg sodium)
  • 15oz can tomato sauce (260mg sodium to 280mg sodium, checking the various discount brands in my cupboard)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil (0.27mg sodium, preferably in a spray can rather than bottled)

(Sauce total: 284.93mg sodium, but you're going to divide it out to 94.98mg for the sauce.)

Heat tomato sauce in a sauce pan on the stove at high temperature. While heating, spray the oil on top in a thin layer, or lightly pour your tablespoon of liquid over the surface of the sauce. Stir in all the spices, then continue stirring for about 5 minutes on high (it should be trying to boil). Cover the pan and lower the temperature to medium and let sit for 5 minutes. Careful of it spitting when you open it to stir, then let sit for another 5 minutes. Turn to a low temp and let simmer.

Meat:

  • 1 tilapia filet (75mg sodium)
  • 1/4 tsp basil (0.02mg sodium)
  • Up to 1/3 of the sauce you just made

Preheat the stove to 400°F (200°C). Make a tin-foil boat large enough to fit the filet with edges to fold over. Pour a light coating of the sauce on the bottom, then lay your filet in the boat. Add more sauce to where it lightly covers the edges of the fish (not too much, or the boat will fold on you and make a mess), spreading it over the top of it, then sprinkle basil over the result. Close the top of the boat together and set it in the oven on the top rack. Let cook for 20 minutes. (At 20 minutes, use a fork to lightly poke it and turn. If it's done, it should be very easy to tear with the fork. If not, check back every 2 minutes.)

Pasta:

  • 1 cup, dry farfalle/bowtie noodles (6mg sodium)
  • 1 qt water

Despite what you've always been told, there is no reason to add salt to boiling pasta. It's mostly done to add salt evenly, and if you're adding sauce, you don't even notice whether it's there or not. Anyway, bring the water to a boil. Once it's boiling, add the dry pasta and stir periodically based on how long it says on the side of the box. It should be al dente about the time you're done with the fish. Once it's cooked to your preferred softness, strain the pasta and rinse it twice to get the excess starch off it.

Plate the pasta, then set the fish on top of the pasta, then pour the sauce from the "boat" over it. (Meal total: up to 176mg sodium) Turn off the stove and set your sauce aside to cool.

After the sauce has cooled, divide it into ziplock bags and close them. You should be able to divide it out to about as much as you used on this meal per bag. Once you've checked that they're sealed good over the sink, then put them in your freezer laid out flat so it will freeze shaped sort of like a slice of bread. When you want to use one, bend the bag so that the frozen block of sauce breaks up, then dump the blocks into a bowl to microwave, heating it on your microwave's thaw setting (usually 30% power) and stirring it in 30 second intervals until it's melted, then continuing at full power in 30 second intervals until it's hot. You can cook the meat and pasta as needed, and even swap in different pasta or meat. This will work with beef, mahi mahi, salmon, flounder, chicken, and the portabella mushrooms I mention below, but the cook time and method will vary for each.

An "accidentally vegan" portabella mushroom recipe I modified slightly for this:

Spoiler
  • 2 large portabella (5mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp basil (0.07mg sodium)
  • 1 tsp ground red pepper (0.53mg sodium - ground ancho pepper is better, but hard to find)
  • 1 tsp white pepper (0.04mg sodium, or subtsitute with 1/4 tsp black pepper at 0.12mg sodium)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil (0.27mg sodium, in a spray can)
  • 1/2 tsp thyme (0.04mg sodium)
  • 1 fresh roma tomato (5mg sodium)

The numbers on this are much more approximate, but that adds up to about 11mg of sodium. Despite how it sounds, this is substantial enough for a main course. 

Preheat the oven to 400°F/200°C. Cover a cookie sheet/baking pan in foil (should be folded at the edges to keep liquid in). Slice the portabella in long, 1/4 inch thick strips (you can actually get it pre-cut this way too) and lay each strip on the foil on its side. Spray the olive oil over each piece, making sure to get it on all sides lightly. Sprinkle the basil and thyme over each, giving a light dusting. Then do the same in turn with the white pepper and finally the red/ancho pepper. Thinly slice the roma tomato into small strips to lightly cover the top surface of the portabella strips. Place the pan in the oven for 10 minutes. 

 

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1 hour ago, Shattered Rift said:

I'm sorry to hear that your week has been so rough, Kirby. I can't imagine needing to adjust my diet that drastically, but I can relate to not being able to dance (and it's the worst thing in the world).

Rhythm Two Step? What's the basic step that you're doing for it? There are a lot of different names that get used regionally for the various dances, and I'm assuming it's a country dance (and the names on those tend to vary even more).

Yeah it's got a million names, AZ Two Step is also what I have heard it called. I don't know enough to be sure this is enough information, but it's just pick a direction, one two three tap five tap, kept stationary by slightly offsetting into a circular motion or keeping the left steps shorter than the right. Your basic country music drink and dance.

Um, this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojH48cjOYQ8
 

And I will look at those recipes, seem pretty good. Thank you for taking the time! I have some no salt added pasta sauce that I can play with from Trader Joe's :) Making a basic chicken dish that my friend sent me tonight. I snagged some bananas, strawberries and protein powder yesterday, just tried doing some stuff with that.

Edited by Kirby-oh

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I'm only seven minutes in, but it's made me smile, laugh, shake my head, and feel a full spectrum of emotions. I think the best part is that this dance doesn't seem to care: it's just making things up wherever it wants! (Ah, country dancing.) Looks easy enough overall, so I'm sure you'll have it down soon enough. If you want a piece of advice, and this will vary from woman to woman, women who go out dancing tend to prefer a man who can dance well to a man who can show off. In other words, just work on the fundamentals and one signature move. Don't try to learn everything too quickly.

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Yeah, you just make it up! I forgot to mention that. I am watching a slightly more through video series on it than that, where the outside turn is video 4. I didn't finish the one that I posted. While I was out at the bar we chose, named Moonshine, I definitely saw that the outside spin, inside spin and free spin are the majority of what people do, other than the occasional established couples that go all out for some songs.

 

I probably won't completely understand how made up it seems, but I am interested in any other thoughts you have.

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When I say made up I mostly mean the timing. It's just kind of making up whatever timing it needs. There's also a bit of country swing being fused in there with a lot of the later moves in that video. If the country swing is being done in your scene, it's pretty easy to pick up and play with. The main thing I'd say is just be solid but gentle in your leading, if that makes sense. A lot of guys tend to lead way too strong, and a gentler lead will get noticed/respected for that. Or, to phrase it a different way: guide her, but don't force her. It's really difficult to explain via words.

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