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    I too went without computer and internet for a long period of time, in the past though. It wasn't hard for me to drop everything you are working on and start something new. I think its the same feeling as "giving up," which I hear is the easy road to things. Withdrawal comes from perhaps an addiction of some sort. I was a bit addicted to playing games, and when I stopped my gaming upkeep, the feeling of giving up was greater than a feeling of hanging on (withdrawal). I've had numerous times prior to experience failure and giving up, so I think this helped me rid myself of effects of chronic withdrawal. It's not like this sort of addiction is a drug-addiction too. I've often been told from people around me that the cause of everything that is bad is my computer, games, and technology in general. I took this advice and let myself not touch technology for maybe half a year. I found that when I stopped indulging in my computer time, I had a lesser indulgence in something else. I went out and hanged out with friends. Went outdoorsy, went to bars, went to house game parties, etc I was thinking, why is one form of indulgence better than the other? What makes it acceptable? Obviously one is culturally acceptable. But I felt that factor muddies the real verdict. So I broke down the fundamental benefits of each form of indulgence. The computer is a portal to greater knowledge. It is infinitely growing in complexity. You can create anything you want and learn whatever you want. The drawback is that it is changing too fast and is viewed as this "other world." People who do not use it find it strange and not human. I was on a plane the other night, and a drunk lady that sat next to me yelled at me for reading an article on my phone. She educated me the difference between speaking to another human through a device and in person. One was more real, personable, human. The other was machine. The social life, often defined as "having a life" itself is culturally acceptable. It offers a traditional and even more effective means of social networking. Often leads to a partner in life I think. Speech is an ability that you don't often practice on the computer (even though you can). Eye contact and body language seems to be important to people. I don't care for that stuff. You get a lot of health benefits than sitting around too. I think the drawback, from my own personal experience anyways, is that you are not exposed to new ideas as much as you can be; tunnel vision. Gossip, word of mouth, can lead to a disaster, AKA drama. I don't know if it was the drama that ensued at the climax of relationships, but it felt like the people around me were emulating the drama they see in shows or something. They were non-issues, but they do a lot of damage. It's like the bigger picture didn't matter, and this incredibly minor issue turns out to be the nuclear bomb of a happy community. Such forms of hysteria exists on the internet and in real life, but more-so damaging in real life. I chose mostly option 1 later on, as it relates to my life goals. This option also helped me with a "less materialized" way of living. The computer and cell phones are devices that compact multiple devices into one. It's less material overall. Also, it can simulate many things. If you want to snowboard, you can play a snowboarding game. I know it's not the same thing, but take it as a trial before doing the real thing. You don't need a snowboard, you don't need a board game, a basketball, a frisbee. Forget camping. If the goal is less material, a computer life is the best package. Forget having a variety of clothes to dress up nicely (I wear the same thing everyday to work... haha), a car, outdoorsy equipment. You just need a bed(optional, but good for your back nonetheless), a computer, a toothbrush, a couple sets of clothing, some toilet paper, soap, a notebook, whatever you need for your job, and that should be good. Lastly, Ascetic living is defined as a form of living without typical or worldly indulgence and more time spent on the spirit. If you find satisfaction in spending time on your spirit, isn't that an indulgence? What is the criteria for an acceptable indulgence in terms of going ascetic?